DAY 7 - July 22, 1969

Leaving the Lunar Sphere of Influence

Apollo 11 is now about 7 hours into Flight Day 7 and accelerating towards Earth. The crew are continuing to have a quiet day.

Public Affairs Officer Transcriptions 

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 139 hours. The crew of Apollo 11 is in the rest period. We have not contacted them within the last hour, and have not heard from them. All systems aboard the spacecraft performing well. Apollo 11 is now 10,149 nautical miles [18,796 km] from the Moon; approaching the Earth at a velocity of 4,659 feet per second [1,420 m/s]. Spacecraft weight is 26,510 pounds [12,025 kg]. This is Mission Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 140 hours. Apollo 11 is now 12,835 nautical miles [23,770 km] from the Moon. Velocity; 4,552 feet per second [1,387 m/s]. All systems still performing well. Dr Kenneth Beers, the Flight Surgeon, reports his data indicates all three of the crewmen are asleep. This is Mission Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 141 hours. Apollo 11 is 15,488 nautical miles [28,684 km] from the Moon. Velocity; 4,480 feet per second [1,366 m/s]. Crew is still asleep. All systems continuing to perform very well. This is Mission Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 142 hours, 3 minutes. Apollo 11 is 18,243 nautical miles [33,786 km] from the Moon. Velocity; 4,426 feet per second [1,349 m/s]. Apollo 11 is in the Passive Thermal Control mode. The performance of all systems nominal, and the crew is asleep. This is Mission Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 143 hours. Apollo 11 is 20,704 nautical miles [38,344 km] from the Moon. Velocity; 4,390 feet per second [1,338 m/s]. The crew, still in the rest period. The weather bureau's space flight meteorology group reported this morning that weather conditions in the primary landing area are expected to be acceptable - the sky partly cloudly, winds easterly at 10 knots and seas of 3 feet are predicted. Tropical storm Claudia is now located 2,300 miles east of the landing area and will not affect the weather in the landing area Thursday. This is Mission Control, Houston.
[Tropical storm Claudia was a Pacific Ocean depression upgraded to storm status on July 22 but downgraded again on July 23.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 144 hours. Apollo 11 is 23,289 nautical miles [43,131 km] from the Moon; approaching the Earth at a velocity of 4,361 feet per second [1,329 m/s]. All systems performing well, and the crew still in the rest period. It does not appear likely that we will perform Midcourse Correction number 5 scheduled for approximately 150½ hours elapsed time. However, a firm decision on this Midcourse will not be made for approximately 3½ hours. This is Mission Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 145 hours. Apollo 11 is 25,857 nautical miles [47,887 km] from the Moon, heading toward home at 4,338 feet per second [1,322 m/s]. Apollo 11 will leave the Moon's sphere of influence at an elapsed time of 148 hours, 7 minutes, 23 seconds. This is Mission Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 146 hours. We have heard nothing from the crew. We assume they are still asleep. That sleep period began at about 137 hours, 47 minutes. At this time, Apollo 11 is 28,421 nautical miles [52,636 km] from the Moon, and traveling at a speed of 4,322 feet per second [1,317 m/s]. The decision on Midcourse Correction number 5 is still tending toward not doing that Midcourse. However the decision hasn't been made finally and there will be some additional tracking prior - prior to firming up that decision. At this point, it appears that the Midcourse at the number 5 opportunity would require about 4 to 5 feet per second [1.2 to 1.5 m/s]. By waiting until the opportunity of Midcourse Correction 6, about 7 feet per second [2.1 m/s] would be required. We do not plan to awaken the crew, at least immediately. Let them continue sleeping. All spacecraft systems continue to look very good to us here on the ground. We've completed the change of shift here in Mission Control. Flight Director Clifford Charlesworth has relieved Milton Windler, and our Capsule Communicator is astronaut Bruce McCandless. At 146 hours, 2 minutes; this is Apollo Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 147 hours. The Flight Surgeon reported a short while ago that the crew appeared still to be sleeping. However, we have seen some signs of activity aboard the spacecraft; suspect they may be awakening shortly. At the present time, Apollo 11 is 30,980 nautical miles [57,375 km] from the Moon. Speed is 4,308 feet per second [1,313 m/s]. The Flight Plan for today is relatively quiet and we are continuing to await the crew's own awakening. We don't plan to awaken them from the ground at this time. At 147 hours, 1 minute; this is Mission Control, Houston.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 147 hours, 30 minutes. The Flight Surgeon reported a short while ago that the Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin appears to be up at this time. Both Armstrong and Collins appear still to be sleeping. At the present time, Apollo 11 is 32,253 nautical miles [59,733 km] from the Moon and traveling at a speed of 4,303 feet per second [1,312 m/s]. Flight Director Clifford Charlesworth has elected to perform the Midcourse Correction maneuver scheduled at Trans-Earth Injection plus 15 hours. That would be at about 150 hours, 25 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. The exact time of that Midcourse Correction is not critical and it could move around somewhat. We expect that it would be a velocity change of about 5 feet per second [1.5 m/s]. We expect there will be some conversation with the crew before too much longer. We'll come back up when we hear from the - from the spacecraft. This is Apollo Control at 147 hours, 32 minutes.

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 147 hours, 39 minutes. The Flight Surgeon reports that all three crewmen now are awake. We expect to be hearing a 'good morning' from the spacecraft before too much longer so we'll stand by for that. We said goodnight to the crew last night at about 137 hours and 47 minutes so they have apparently had a good 10-hour rest period and we'll probably be getting a crew status report indicating just how much sleep each of the crewmen got. We'll stand by for any conversation with the spacecraft.

PAO: This is Apollo Control; 161 hours, 28 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. The crew of Columbia is now in a 10-hour sleep period. The official time they went to sleep according to the Surgeon, Dr. Ken Beers, is 160 hours, 42 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; almost an hour ago. The Columbia now is 141,369 nautical miles [261,815 km] out from Earth, approaching at a velocity of 4,628 feet per second [1,411 m/s]. Entry clock now showing 33 hours, 34 minutes to entry or 400,000 feet altitude. Here in Mission Control, the Black Team of flight controllers headed up by Glynn Lunney is moving in to take over for the next eight hours or so. Spacecraft Communicator Charlie Duke, will be replaced by Ron Evans, who just entered the room. And at 161 hours, 29 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.